On April 7, 2010 Slashdot.com reported on the Google giving the feds access to Gmail:

“Google condemns the Chinese Government for censoring its results, and Australia for planning to do the same. Meanwhile, its lawyers and security experts have told employees to ‘be intentionally vague about whether or not we’ve given access to end-user accounts,’ according to engineer James Tarquin, hinting that Google may be sharing its data with the US government. Perhaps Australia’s most hated communications minister, Steven Conroy, could be right in his criticism of Google’s privacy record after all.

Yesterday wired.com reported the Yahoo battles with the feds over email privacy:

Yahoo and federal prosecutors in Colorado are embroiled in a privacy battle that’s testing whether the Constitution’s warrant requirements apply to Americans’ e-mail.

The  legal dust-up, unsealed late Tuesday, concerns a 1986 law that already allows the government to obtain a suspect’s e-mail from an ISP or webmail provider without a probable-cause warrant, once it’s been stored for 180 days or more. The government now contends it can get e-mail under 180-days old if that e-mail has been read by the owner, and the Constitution’s Fourth Amendment protections don’t apply.

Yahoo is challenging the government’s position and defying a court order to turn over some customer e-mail to the feds. Google, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the Center for Democracy & Technology and other groups late Tuesday told the federal judge presiding over the case that accessing e-mail under 180 days old requires a valid warrant under the Fourth Amendment, regardless of whether it has been read.

So the question has to be asked, what’s got the so government interested in your email?

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